Top 10 Best 4K Projectors - Jun 2019

48,480 Reviews Scanned

Are you looking for the best 4K Projectors? Let’s go ahead and have a look at our top 10 best 4K Projectors in Jun 2019.


We have scanned 48,480 reviews and come down with top 10 best 4K Projectors from Electronics & Computers products.


Here are our top 10 best 4K Projectors in 2019 reviews. Take a look at our recommended items and learn more about the features of each to help you select the item to buy.

Rank Product Name Score
1 First Place Epson Home Cinema 4000 3LCD Home Theater Projector with 4K Enhancement, HDR Epson Home Cinema 4000 3LCD Home Theater Projector with 4K Enhancement, HDR
By Epson
9.8
Score
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2 BenQ HT2550 4K UHD HDR Home Theater Projector, 8.3 Million Pixels, 2200 Lumens BenQ HT2550 4K UHD HDR Home Theater Projector, 8.3 Million Pixels, 2200 Lumens
By BenQ
9.5
Score
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3 Optoma UHD60 4K Ultra High Definition Home Theater Projector Optoma UHD60 4K Ultra High Definition Home Theater Projector
By Optoma
9.2
Score
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4 Best Value Optoma UHD50 4K Ultra High Definition Home Theater Projector Optoma UHD50 4K Ultra High Definition Home Theater Projector
By Optoma
8.8
Score
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5 BenQ TK800 Home Theater Video Projector BenQ TK800 Home Theater Video Projector
By BenQ
8.6
Score
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6 Optoma UHD51A Amazon Alexa Enabled 4K Ultra High Definition Home Theater Projector Optoma UHD51A Amazon Alexa Enabled 4K Ultra High Definition Home Theater Projector
By Optoma
8.2
Score
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7 ViewSonic PX727-4K 4K UHD RGBRGB Rec. 709 DLP Home Theater Projector with HDR ViewSonic PX727-4K 4K UHD RGBRGB Rec. 709 DLP Home Theater Projector with HDR
By ViewSonic
8.0
Score
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8 Epson Home Cinema 4010 4K PRO-UHD 3-Chip Projector with HDR Epson Home Cinema 4010 4K PRO-UHD 3-Chip Projector with HDR
By Epson
7.7
Score
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9 Vivitek HK2288 UHD 4K DLP Projector w/ HDR Refurbished w/ All In One Vivitek HK2288 UHD 4K DLP Projector w/ HDR Refurbished w/ All In One
By Vivitek
7.5
Score
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10 ViewSonic PX747-4K 3500 Lumens 4K UHD RGBRGB Rec. 709 DLP Home Theater Projector ViewSonic PX747-4K 3500 Lumens 4K UHD RGBRGB Rec. 709 DLP Home Theater Projector
By ViewSonic
7.0
Score
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Should You Buy a Projector? - TV vs Projector

What's up, guys? This is Chris Majestic here of Majestechs.

Every time I have people over my house, and they come down my basement, I get a bunchof questions about my projection set up for my home theater.

Today, I want to talk about projectors and why you might want to consider one over a TV.

So stay tuned.

Now, a funny story.

Actually, about two years ago, I posted a video comparing two short throw projectors,and that video actually got enough views to inspire me to start this YouTube channel ayear later.

Now, I've helped enough people set up projects in their house that I figured it might behelpful to make a video about it.

Now, it is important to consider that projectors and TVs serve two different purposes, and thereare pros and cons to both.

Now, for some reason, people tend to think that projectors are really expensive, but inmost cases, a good budget projector is actually going to cost you less than a large TV.

Right now, the projector that I use in my basement cost me just under 900 bucks whenI bought it two years ago.

Now, as you know, a projector is going to require you to have some type of a screen or a surfacefor you to display an image.

Now, there's a bunch of different ways that you can go about doing this, but what I endedup doing was building my own screen.

I just took a bunch of wood, made a frame out of it.

I bought some Carl's FlexiWhite Screen Material.

I stretched it over the frame and stapled it, and then I put felt tape around it.

It was really simple to do.

I'll actually link some of those materials that I bought in the description of this videoso you can check them out if you're interested.

I've got a 140" 16 x 9 screen that cost me just over a hundred bucks to build.

Now, there are a few different screen types.

If you're not handy, you can actually buy a fixed frame screen if you want to.

You've got pull-down screens, and then you can actually just paint the wall.

If you've got a blank wall in our basement, drywall, you can paint that with some goodpaint, and you'll be just fine with that as well.

Now, of those options, a fixed frame is pretty much going to give you the best picture qualityfor the most part, but if you don't have the money, painting a wall does work really well.

Now, considering that a projector is using light from a bulb, it's not going to be asbright as a TV, so they typically work better in a basement or a dedicated theater room,somewhere where you can easily control the light.

Now, if you really do want to put it into a bright room, there are ways that you cancombat that.

You can make the screen a little bit smaller just because the bigger the screen is, thedarker the picture's going to be, so that's going to help you fight light when you makethe picture a little smaller.

You can also get different types of screen material that'll actually reject the light,or you can get different types of paints if you're putting it on a wall that'll help itwith that as well.

Now, another thing that you need to consider is throw distance, and throw is basicallyhow far the projector is from the wall or from the screen.

The average projector needs to be several feet away from your screen in order to projecta large image.

Let's say, for instance, you want to do an 120" screen.

Most projectors are probably going to need to be about 13 or 14 feet away in order toget that size picture.

That is something you may want to consider if you're thinking about putting a projectorin a small space.

You definitely want to consider throw.

Now, if you really don't have the space, you can buy what's called the short throw projector,which is what I actually bought, and that allows you to put the projector way closerto the screen.

Some of them actually can be sit right in front of the screen.

Some of them you can sit a few feet away.

In my case, I have 140" screen, and it's sitting about 9.

5 feet away.

A short throw projector is going to allow you to project a really large image from ashorter distance.

Now, short throw projectors do cost a little bit more, and the image quality does suffera little bit comparing it to a non-short throw projector, but it's not really enough formost people to notice.

Another thing I want to mention about projectors is lamp or bulb life.

I've always heard that the lamps burn out and they're really expensive to replace, whichmeans it's not worth getting a projector.

That's not really true anymore in the case of budget projectors.

First, we need to consider that you're going to get an average of about 4,000 hours outof the lamp, which is a considerable amount of time for the projector to be on.

Now, if you do go beyond that, and the lamp does burn out, it's only going to cost youaround a hundred dollars to replace the bulb on a budget projector.

That's not really bad at all.

Now, TVs are great for just about any space, but when you want something really large andyou're comparing them to a projector, it can get really, really expensive.

A really cheap 70" TV is going to cost you maybe around a thousand bucks.

A good 70" TV is going to cost you 1,800.

Once you start to get into 80 or 85" TVs, you're well on to four or five, $6,000 ormore.

Now, to be fair, TVs do have a lot of benefits over projectors.

The first thing is that they're really, really bright, so you really don't have to worryabout putting it in a bright room because it's bright enough that it's going to overpowerwhatever light you have in the room.

Another thing about TVs is that most of them are smart now.

They have smart features built in to them.

That's not something you're normally going to find in a projector.

In order to get smart features on a projector, you'd have to hook up something like a Roku,Chromecast, or a Fire TV or something like that.

Another thing to consider is 4K and HDR.

Now, there are 4K HDR projectors out there, but if you're the average person and you'rereally, really interested in 4K HDR, you might want to consider a TV over a projector, unlessyou're willing to pay at least $10,000.

Now, after hearing that, I'm sure you're probably thinking, "Why would anybody buy a projectorover a TV after hearing all the benefits of a TV?"Well, there are two reasons you might want to consider a projector.

Reason number one is "wow" factor.

There's nothing like walking into a room and seeing a huge screen with a nice picture onit.

Now, let's consider that the average movie theater is going to use a 2K projector, whichis very close to just a 1080p projector.

Now, depending on where you're sitting in that movie theater, you could actually havea better experience at home sitting in front of a 120" screen 10 feet away.

If you're sitting way back in a movie theater, then yes, that's going to be a really sharppicture to you because you're not right up, and you can't really see the pixels, but ifyou're sitting on the first few rows, you're definitely going to notice a drastic differencein picture quality.

This means you can take a 1080p projector, put it in your basement, and you can actuallyget sharper images than you get at the movies.

Long story short, most people would be more impressed walking into a home theater witha huge screen in it and with a thousand dollar projector than they would with an 80" $8,000TV.

Reason number two is that it's more immersive.

Trust me when I tell you that having a huge 1080p screen versus having a smaller 4K screencan definitely be a much better experience.

I mean, how would you feel if you walked into a movie theater, and they had an 80" screenon the wall instead of a 50' screen?That's the major difference between a projector and a TV.

Now, that's not to say that you can't get a 4K projector.

I mean, if you want to spend the money, you definitely can get one, but the technologyis moving so fast that I personally don't think it's worth getting right now.

We've just gone over a bunch of pros and cons for TVs and projectors.

Now, I'm not trying to tell you that projectors are better TVs.

I'm just laying out the facts.

I actually just bought a 65" HDR TV, and I love it.

If I'm watching certain things like sports or if I wanted to just watch a quick movieupstairs, I have no problem doing that in my living room, but if I want to really experiencea movie, I'm going to go downstairs in my basement and watch it on a 140" screen.

Now that we've talked all about video, we're definitely not going to stop there.

Another thing I want you to consider is that the visual experience is only half the battle.

The other half is going to be audio.

Once you get that projector up, the very first thing you're going to want to do is upgradeyour audio if you don't have a decent audio set up because, trust me, once you set upthat big screen, if you have small sound coming out of it, it's going to ruin your experience.

Now, I have a 9.

2 channel home theater set up in my basement.

You don't necessarily have to do a 9.

2 setup, but definitely try to do at least a 5.

1 ifyou can.

If you want to get a sound bar, that's fine.

Just make sure that you have decent audio because when you have a larger screen, ifyou have smaller sound, it's going to make the screen feel smaller than it actually is.

If were interested in projectors, I'm really hoping this video helped you, but I did wantto clear up some questions and some common misconceptions about projectors and just comparethem to TVs to help you out if you're thinking about it.

All right, well, that's going to do it for this video, guys.

As always, if you like this video, mash that like button for me.

Go ahead and post your comments and your questions in the comment sections.

I'll respond to your comments, and I'll see you guys in the next video.

.