Top 10 Best Bread Knives - Jun 2019

12,243 Reviews Scanned

Are you looking for the best Bread Knives? Let’s go ahead and have a look at our top 10 best Bread Knives in Jun 2019.


We have scanned 12,243 reviews and come down with top 10 best Bread Knives from Home, Garden & Tools products.


Here are our top 10 best Bread Knives in 2019 reviews. Take a look at our recommended items and learn more about the features of each to help you select the item to buy.

Rank Product Name Score
1 First Place J.A. Henckels International Forged Premio 8-Inch Bread J.A. Henckels International Forged Premio 8-Inch Bread
By ZWILLING J.A. Henckels
9.7
Score
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2 SAKEN Bread Knife - 10 inch serrated – Kitchen Bread Knife in Luxury SAKEN Bread Knife - 10 inch serrated – Kitchen Bread Knife in Luxury
By Saken
9.5
Score
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3 Best Value Moone Serrated Bread Knife 8 Inches High Carbon Stainless Steel Kitchen Cutlery Moone Serrated Bread Knife 8 Inches High Carbon Stainless Steel Kitchen Cutlery
By Moone
9.0
Score
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4 Calphalon Classic Forged Cutlery 8-in. Serrated Bread Knife Calphalon Classic Forged Cutlery 8-in. Serrated Bread Knife
By Calphalon
8.9
Score
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5 Mercer Culinary Genesis 8-Inch Forged Bread Knife Mercer Culinary Genesis 8-Inch Forged Bread Knife
By Genesis
8.7
Score
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6 Victorinox Cutlery 7-Inch Wavy Edge Bread Knife, Black Fibrox Handle Victorinox Cutlery 7-Inch Wavy Edge Bread Knife, Black Fibrox Handle
By Victorinox
8.4
Score
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7 Cangshan H1 Series 59175 Wood Handle German Steel Forged Bread Knife, 10.25-Inch Cangshan H1 Series 59175 Wood Handle German Steel Forged Bread Knife, 10.25-Inch
By Cangshan
8.1
Score
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8 KUTLER 14" Stainless Steel Serrated Bread Knife Cake Knife KUTLER 14" Stainless Steel Serrated Bread Knife Cake Knife
By Kutler
7.7
Score
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9 F Dick Pro Dynamic 9" Offset Bread Knife, Large F Dick Pro Dynamic 9" Offset Bread Knife, Large
By F. Dick
7.4
Score
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10 J.A. HENCKELS INTERNATIONAL Forged Synergy 8-inch Bread Knife J.A. HENCKELS INTERNATIONAL Forged Synergy 8-inch Bread Knife
By ZWILLING J.A. Henckels
7.2
Score
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Making the Sharpest Bread Knife

This just in!Experts report bread is becoming increasingly tougher to slice.

People around the world have been taking up arms against hearty rye loaves in desperateattempts to harvest their breakfast bread.

Now this one man from Sweden thinks he has found the solution, stay tuned for more afterthese messages, right here, on WSNL.

Bread is amazing, especially these lovely hard crust sourdough concoctions that's becomeso popular as of late.

One issue is that even the best of knives struggle making their way through their crunchyouter shell.

I say we do something about that!I say, while our friend here helplessly is tiring himself out, let's go down to the workshopand see if we can't make his life a little easier!?First of all you're going to want to find yourself one of these, a pruning saw blade!If you're not lucky like me and find it from the trash, let your imagination run wild,steal one from your neighbor or maybe use an old worn out crosscut sawblade scored froma thriftshop.

I always find it difficult to gauge the size of a handle when making a knife, so I endedup making a mockup out of stiff paper to figure out somewhat how it would fit in my hand.

If you don't have a laser cutter to cut out your mockup then scissors, an x-acto-bladeor even the Maker Knife works just as well!I had some spare walnut trim laying around which I figured would work just swell forthe scales of this bread knife.

This will be put together more or less like a traditional knife, using brass pins to holdthe scales together around the tang of the blade, so if you care about grain matchingyou should probably cut this out from the same piece rather than using trim like I'mdoing.

02 Lay out your template on one of the scales and mark the correct position of the holesfor the pins.

I had previously made sure that they lined up well with the factory made holes on thesaw blade, so everything would fit together nicely.

After you drill out the first two holes tape the scales together and drill through theholes you just made to make matching holes in the oppsite side of the knife handle.

To make doubly sure that the holes will align fit a brass pin in the first hole after youdrill that through and continue drilling the second hole.

Before we continue, let's see how our friend is doing with that bread?No.

.

.

no.

.

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okay, carry on.

Most of the shaping of the knife handle will be made after we attach the blade, but thearea around the heel, near the front of the handle, will be impossible to get to oncethe blade has been fitted so therefore should be dealt with beforehand.

Since the tang of our blade doesn't extend through the entire handle I made up a shimof a contrasting wood to fit in between, in fact this the same veneer I used to buildthe legs in my recent stool building video.

This was cut out to match the contour of the tang of the blade, and again if you don'thave a laser cutter you can do it just as well with regular cutting tools.

03 As this will be glued up using epoxy I really want to avoid any sort of squeezeouton the blade itself.

Therefore I taped down the area around where the blade meets the handle, and dry fittedthe scales beforehand to cut away all the tape from under the scales, while leavingtape on the blade, protecting it from any glue squeezing out.

Then it's just a matter of mixing up some of your favorite epoxy glue, unless I'm ona time critical mission I tend to go for the 30 minute variant for some extra working time.

Our friend in the kitchen can wait a little longer.

Make sure you don't forget to fit the two pins through the tang to make sure everythingstays aligned, as well as putting the shim in between the scales.

You also really don't need to go crazy with the epoxy, a light coating on the surfacesgoes a long way.

Since you'll be clamping it up the space that the epoxy needs to fill is minimal, and theless squeezeout you have the easier everything will be.

While the glue cures let's check in on that bread one last time.

Still not even half way!Our friend sure is working up a sweat.

Hang in there buddy, help is coming!04 Once the glue has cured you can drill more holes for some extra brass pins.

To be perfectly frank, those pins are not really needed, but as this knife will be usedin a kitchen the pins will help fulfill the esthetic of its environment.

Once you get the pins in you can get going on the most fun part, shaping the handle!Go crazy, go wild, go simple and sleek, do what your heart desires!Since this will be used by working hands, in a kitchen, I would steer clear from anysort of varnish.

A nice mineral oil, or something like salad bowl finish or similarly food safe oils wouldprobably be the best.

Mm mm mm, got to love how oil brings out the depth in walnut.

That handle pops!Let's head back into the kitchen and see if we can't make a dent in that delicious sourdoughloaf!It makes perfect slices every time with little effort!Sure it creates about 300% more crumbs along the way, but if you save those you can makesome amazing breadcrumb crusts on your pies and gratains!Enter a new champion in the kitchen, the Breadknife 2.

0, sure to make all your other knives cowerin fear and envy!Glad to see you followed this journey to the end.

There are many more videos on this channel, and you know where to go if you haven't subscribedalready!Until next time!.

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