Top 10 Best Spotting Scopes - Jun 2019

30,835 Reviews Scanned

Are you looking for the best Spotting Scopes? Let’s go ahead and have a look at our top 10 best Spotting Scopes in Jun 2019.


We have scanned 30,835 reviews and come down with top 10 best Spotting Scopes from Sports & Outdoors products.


Here are our top 10 best Spotting Scopes in 2019 reviews. Take a look at our recommended items and learn more about the features of each to help you select the item to buy.

Rank Product Name Score
1 First Place Celestron 52250 80mm Ultima Zoom Spotting Scope Celestron 52250 80mm Ultima Zoom Spotting Scope
By Celestron
9.8
Score
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2 Best Value Bushnell Trophy Xtreme Spotting Scope, Green, 20-60 x 65mm Bushnell Trophy Xtreme Spotting Scope, Green, 20-60 x 65mm
By Bushnell
9.5
Score
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3 SightMark Spotting Scopes Solitude 20-60x80SE Spotting Scope Kit SM11032K SightMark Spotting Scopes Solitude 20-60x80SE Spotting Scope Kit SM11032K
By Sightmark
9.1
Score
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4 Barska 30-90x90 Waterproof Colorado Spotter Scope and Tripod Barska 30-90x90 Waterproof Colorado Spotter Scope and Tripod
By BARSKA
9.0
Score
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5 20-60x80WP, Angled Spotting Scope 20-60x80WP, Angled Spotting Scope
By Barska
8.7
Score
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6 Sightmark SM11031K Solitude 20-60x60SE Spotting Scope Kit Sightmark SM11031K Solitude 20-60x60SE Spotting Scope Kit
By Sightmark
8.4
Score
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7 Black Spotting scope stand 7/8" rod. High Power, National Match, High Power Black Spotting scope stand 7/8" rod. High Power, National Match, High Power
8.0
Score
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8 Leupold 15 - 45x60mm SX - 1 Ventana 2 Spotting Scope Kit Leupold 15 - 45x60mm SX - 1 Ventana 2 Spotting Scope Kit
By Leupold
7.6
Score
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9 ELLTOE 20-60x80mm Porro Prism Spotting Scope with Tripod, 45-Degree Angled Big Eyepiece,Waterproof Fogproof ELLTOE 20-60x80mm Porro Prism Spotting Scope with Tripod, 45-Degree Angled Big Eyepiece,Waterproof Fogproof
By ELLTOE
7.4
Score
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10 Barska Colorado Waterproof Spotting Scope w/Deluxe Tripod, 30x-90x90mm, DA12194 Barska Colorado Waterproof Spotting Scope w/Deluxe Tripod, 30x-90x90mm, DA12194
7.2
Score
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How To Choose A Spotting Scope - OpticsPlanet.com

Hi, I'm Trevor from OpticsPlanet.

If you're looking for a spotting scope and you're not quite surewhich one to choose, here's some helpful hints that can help you in your decision.

As you can see,there's a lot of different spotting scopes on the market: different sizes, different numbers go alongwith those, starting with what you're going to be using the spotting scope for.

Are you going to bebirding, hunting, target shooting, general sightseeing? There's a lot of different categoriesthat are going to use different spotting scopes and they usually require different criteria for each of thoseapplications.

We're going to start with a hunting spotting scope.

If you're looking for a huntingspotting scope, you're going to want to narrow your criteria to a couple certain things.

One of the thingsI look for in a hunting scope: you want it to be compact.

If you're going to be hunting, chances areyou're going to be lugging this along with you whether you're traveling in and out of a truck,you're going to want something more compact and lightweight.

That's what I usually look for in ahunting spotting scope.

Something like this scope right here, extremely compact, can almost fit in aCaribou pocket, easily fit in a pack.

Now, magnification wise, how much that spotting scopeis going to zoom in, you usually don't need too much and you're kind of limited to the factthat it is more of a compact spotting scope.

So a 15-45 magnification is the most you usually needfor most of your hunting applications.

The objective lens can also be a little bit smaller.

Once again,you're trying to keep that compact feel to it.

So, a 50mm objective lens is usually the most you needand it's going to be perfect for hunting applications.

Now, if you're on a guided hunt, you're going to bein and out of a truck.

Often enough, size isn't as important and neither is the weight, so you can usea larger spotting scope, even something this size, if it's going to be inside the truck.

So, that's somethingto look for as well.

If you're looking for a spotting scope for target shooting, the options are prettymuch endless and there's a lot of different options out there and you're not going to know where tostart.

What I like to start with in target shooting is looking at the numbers and I mean the magnification, specifically, and then the objective size.

With target shooting, you're usually going to be stationary, sometimes you're moving around a little bit, so weight isn't an issue.

Chances are that you're justgoing to be mounting it on a tripod and you're going to want it close to your proximity so you can easilyglance at it, look at the target, and then get back to your shooting.

So, when it comes to a target shootingspotting scope, I want more magnification.

I like to err on the side of over magnification.

If I'm shootingat 500 yards, 800 yards, 1000 yards, 1200 yards, you can still effectively use a spotting scope dependingon what your target is and your shooting situations.

What I look for in a target spotting scope, anythingfrom 25 yards out to, at least, 600 yards.

I want 20-60 magnification.

That's my perfect magnificationrange.

You know, like, when you go back to a riflescope, 3-9x40, the ideal classic range with atarget spotting scope, 20-60 magnification is perfect for you for most applications.

I use it out toat least 600 yards, sometimes further.

Objective size: bigger is better on this one.

I want at least an80mm.

That's going to allow more light to enter the scope, so on a cloudy day, you still get enough lightin there and on a sunny day, you can usually extend the sunshade that's on most spotting scopes toblock some of that glare out.

Now, if I'm an extreme long range shooter, if I'm going to be shooting 800, 900, 1000 yards and the really extreme ranges of 1200, 1500plus, it really depends on what you'reshooting.

If you're shooting a steel plate, where you have a large impact mark on the plate, you can stilluse a 20-60.

If you're not shooting a steel plate, if you're shooting paper, chances are you're going toneed some video equipment in addition to the spotting scope.

So, that's really another criteriayou need to jump into.

Now, if you're, say, a pistol shooter, you target shoot with a pistol and you'rea long range pistol shooter: some guys shoot a pistol 50, 100, 150 yards, you don't need a 20-60per se.

You can go back and use something like a 15-45, like a smaller range spotter.

Now, if you're goingto get into birding or you already are a birder, you probably know quality optics is the name of the gameand you really need to spend a little bit more money to get that crystal clear optics you're going to reallywant for birding.

So, that's why I recommend to look at a quality optic.

If you've saved up a little bit ofmoney, stretch it out, save a little bit more, jump into that next level.

It's really going to be worthit.

So, I really recommend going for a quality optic.

Magnification wise, it depends on the distancesyou're going to be birding.

If you're using close range, you're going to be in your backyard or park,20-60 yards, you'll be fine with a 15-45.

They also make fixed eyepiece scopes that you can chooseto have a fixed scope eyepiece, like this scope right here, has a variable, and a fixed eyepiece that youcan switch out.

That's ideal for a birding situation, where, if you have your favorite spotting spot, yousit there and you look at a certain area and you want a certain magnification.

You can go with thefixed or you still have the variable option on a lot of different spotting scopes.

If you're just a generalsight seer, you're camping, you know, kind of the last bit of customers that's looking for a greatspotting scope, a lot of different options out there for you.

If you're camping, per se, you're going to belimited with size and weight as well.

So, one of the things I always have on a camping trip is justa pocket magnifier.

It's still considered a spotter but it's small, lightweight, 6x, 8x, 10x, some are variable.

They can go from 8x-25x but a pocket magnifier is an ideal choice for being able to get that extramagnification, looking at the target at a distance, and still be incredibly lightweight and small.

Going along with a small size, a 10-30 or 15-45, these spotting scopes are ideal for a campingsituation where you want to throw them in a backpack.

Now, this comes with a tripod in thisspecific model but just the scope by itself is extremely lightweight and small but still havea quality image.

It's going to be everything you need for camping.

Now, some of the terminology with aspotting scope, in general, mentioned before, we have a straight body spotting scope here.

This is an example of a angled body spotting scope.

Now, people really like straight bodyspotting scopes, especially for digiscoping, work really, really well for that because they're balancingthe camera weight.

I really like the angled body spotting scope because it's easier to have it setat a certain height, myself being 6'4", I can look down and someone else at 5' 5" can easily come upand look down because it's set at a lower height, eyepiece is angled up, so it's very easy for peopleof different heights to look through the spotting scope.

One of the nice features of angled spottingscopes that most do have a collar that can rotate.

So, if I'm in a seated position, especially when targetshooting, with angled body I can rotate the eyepiece to me so instead of having to get up and come overand look down on a spotting scope, I simply turn my eye and then can come back to the rifle.

Now, one ofthe biggest crimes in spotting scopes are tripods.

A wobbly tripod will ruin whatever you're looking through.

There's a lot of different tripods out there: everything from a tabletop tripod, that's greaton a shooting bench, to a free standing tripod that's variable anywhere from 2.

5' up to 7' in heightdepending on the model but invest in a decent tripod.

Almost all spotting scopes today, all thespotting scopes that we carry have a 1/4x20 threadplate on them and that means that thatplate that connects to the tripod, these plates come with the tripod, will screw into the bottom of allthese spotting scopes.

They all have a screw in there and that's a 1/4x20 threading and they'll fit onalmost all tripods that have that standard plate.

Alright guys, hopefully you learned something.

Hopefully this can direct you to the spotting scope that's going to meet your needs and fit your criteria.

If you have any questions on how to choose a spotting scope, how to use it, feel free to leave acomment on this page, definitely give us a call, send an email.

You can direct that at tech sales.

We're going to find you a spotting scope that's going to fit your needs.

I'm Trevor from OpticsPlanet,thanks for watching, guys.

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