Top 10 Best Trail Cameras - Jun 2019

57,733 Reviews Scanned

Are you looking for the best Trail Cameras? Let’s go ahead and have a look at our top 10 best Trail Cameras in Jun 2019.


We have scanned 57,733 reviews and come down with top 10 best Trail Cameras from Sports & Outdoors products.


Here are our top 10 best Trail Cameras in 2019 reviews. Take a look at our recommended items and learn more about the features of each to help you select the item to buy.

Rank Product Name Score
1 First Place Meidase Trail Camera 16MP 1080P, Game Camera Night Vision up to 65ft Meidase Trail Camera 16MP 1080P, Game Camera Night Vision up to 65ft
By Meidase
9.7
Score
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2 Bushnell Trail Cameras 16MP Trophy Cam HD Essential E3 Trail Camera, Brown 12345 Bushnell Trail Cameras 16MP Trophy Cam HD Essential E3 Trail Camera, Brown 12345
By Bushnell
9.5
Score
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3 Wildgame Innovations TR8i1-7 Terra 8 Trail Camera, Black Wildgame Innovations TR8i1-7 Terra 8 Trail Camera, Black
By Wild Game Innovations
9.2
Score
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4 Best Value Wosports Trail Camera, 2018 Upgraded 1080P Hunting Game Camera, Wildlife Camera with Upgraded Wosports Trail Camera, 2018 Upgraded 1080P Hunting Game Camera, Wildlife Camera with Upgraded
By Wosports
8.8
Score
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5 APEMAN Trail Camera 20MP 1080P Hunting Camera 40PCs IR LEDs Game Camera APEMAN Trail Camera 20MP 1080P Hunting Camera 40PCs IR LEDs Game Camera
By APEMAN
8.7
Score
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6 【Upgraded】Victure Trail Camera 1080P 12MP Wildlife Camera Motion Activated Night Vision 20m 【Upgraded】Victure Trail Camera 1080P 12MP Wildlife Camera Motion Activated Night Vision 20m
By Victure
8.3
Score
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7 APEMAN Trail Camera 16MP 1080P Wildlife Camera, Night Detection Game Camera with No APEMAN Trail Camera 16MP 1080P Wildlife Camera, Night Detection Game Camera with No
By APEMAN
8.1
Score
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8 Victure Trail Game Camera 16MP Night Vision Motion Activated with Upgrade Waterproof Design Victure Trail Game Camera 16MP Night Vision Motion Activated with Upgrade Waterproof Design
By Victure
7.6
Score
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9 Campark Trail Game Camera 14MP 1080P Waterproof Hunting Scouting Cam for Wildlife Monitoring Campark Trail Game Camera 14MP 1080P Waterproof Hunting Scouting Cam for Wildlife Monitoring
By Campark
7.4
Score
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10 [2018 New]Trail Camera 16MP Photo, Full HD 1080P Video, 2.4" LCD Color Screen [2018 New]Trail Camera 16MP Photo, Full HD 1080P Video, 2.4" LCD Color Screen
By Zopu
7.3
Score
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Trail Camera Tips

Hey guys this is Austin Delano with Mossy Oak.

Today we're gonna go over some trail-cam tipsto help you get better pictures from you game cameras.

Trail camera basicsthere's some easy things you can do to help your camera pictures turn outbetter to get the best pictures possible.

One thing you want to do is try to keepyour game cameras facing north it's a pretty simple tip but a lot of times yousee a lot of cameras facing due east or due west and you catching way too muchsunlight one way or the other and it washes the picture out so try to keepyour camera's pointing north that'll cut down on a lot of washed outpictures and also false triggers when there's nothing there.

Some of the other things are making sure you've got a clear background behind your picturewhere you intend for the game to be in front of your camera that's gonna make abig difference on being able to distinguish what kind of deer are thereAnother thing is that you want to make sure to use high quality batteries.

You don't want a bunch of cheap batteries that might explode inside of your fouror five hundred dollar game camera sounds like a simple tip but it happensa lot so use good high quality batteries same thing with memory cards the cheapSD sometimes the picture doesn't right onto the card very well so use the highquality cards and they write fast so if you're looking for the best trail camerafor you in your situation you can always go online just look up trail cam reviewswhere you can find out you know all the different information on the differentkinds of cameras are are and what's going to fit your situation the bestso some of the basics on how to set up a trail camera you know today's camerashave got a ton of options on there that you can set them up specific to thesituation that you're putting your camera in front of some of the simplethings to get good deer pictures on your trail camera you're putting your cameraover bait whether it be corn or a mineral lick or whatever you might beusing you want to turn your picture frequency and sensitivity down and whatthat's going to do is keep them from getting too many pictures of the samedeer and just using up a lot of battery on the same deer over and over and onthe flipside if you're just using your camera over a scrape or a trail ormaybe the opening of a food plot you want to turn your picture frequency upand also turn the sensitivity on your camera so that you catch everything thatmoves through there because you're not betting on them coming to one spotbecause of bait you're trying to catch them moving throughwe want to talk a little bit about trail camera placement and where you're gonnabe setting up your camera for the best pictures.

I like to have a trail camera strategy making sure you've got an idea where the deer aregonna be traveling and picking out the best tree or making a tree out of atee post or something similar to that so that you've got the perfect place tomount the camera to get ideal pictures of your deer on the game camera.

One of the things we've got set up right here is we've got a trail coming but we don'thave an ideal tree because it's leaning really bad so what we're gonna do is usea mount that allows us to get the camera at the right angle so that we get thebest pictures from our trail cameraSome of the best places to hang your trail cameras a lot of times there's not atree there you have to improvise a little bit but you want to pay attentionto a spot like we've got right here where you've got a creek crossing you'vegot a food source pretty close by and you can tell if they're traveling to andfrom those areas you can get a camera mounted it's going to catch not onlythem traveling - from the food source we're coming in out of the water whetheryou've got a creek crossing or a mineral site right by a creek crossing.

Some of those are some of the best places for candid pictures where you're not justgot a picture of a deer with its facing a pile of corn but you're just gettingreal-life movement of deer crossing going to and from bedding, food, water, and cover.

So we're gonna talk a little bit about some game camera mounting tips onething I think that gets overlooked is is the height that people mount their trail cameras.

I see a lot of them that get mounted two and three feet off the groundwhich sometimes limits your field of view with your cameras I kind of liketo mount mine up at least head high if not a little bit higher andwhat that allows you do is get the camera up off the ground and angle it down alittle bit so that you're getting a lot wider field of view so that your cameracan pick up a lot more movement from the wider areaso usually most cameras are going to shoot their best pictures daytime atnighttime somewhere between 10 to 20 feetnow when you uses something like this mineral rock we've got here or a baitsite you already know where you're gonna have the deer crossing or moving so youwant to make sure your camera is placed at a good distance to get the bestpictures possible you've got the camera too close to the bait site or themineral whatever you got put out some of your nighttime pictures to get reallyblown out because that flash is too close to the animal so you want to makesure your distance is 10 to 20 feet you know the flash range for most cameras isgonna work best in that 10 15 20 25 feet area rather than it being way too farout and your flash not being able to pick up the target animal out thereSo a lot of guys want to know where to place their trail camera to get somereally good game camera pictures.

In this situation it's late summer they're stillusing warm season food plots like beans and peas really well soanytime you can find some trails with travel corridors coming from bedding tothose food sources those are really good places to get velvet pictures of yourbucks and does that have got fawns traveling to from that food source.

So what we've got here isn't a soybean field that the deer using really heavilywe sleep browse all up and down this tree line but there's really no goodtrees on this tree line to mount a camera on.

So what we're gonna do is just cut a little hole out of this cedar tree and we'll put the camera tuck-in backhere and then we'll use these branches that we cut to kind of weave back inaround the camera kind of camouflage it and that'll keep anytrespassers that might come through from being able to see it and also just keepit out of the deer's face.

A really good tip to use when you're trying to hide your camera is touse the brush that you just cut from the tree, bush, or whatever you've usedand use them to camouflage the camera back in a little bit.

Once you've got the limbs cut out of the field of view of the lens and thiswill just help blend it right back in like it was before you cutand but you're still going to have a nice opening there to have a clearfield of view for your camerahow you hide your trail camera is not just for people but deer sometimesare a little bit spooked when the camera is right in their face.

So if you can get it mounted up just a little bit higher where it'spointing down at its angle you're gonna get a better field of viewand it's a lot less likely for people to see itthat looks pretty good right there.

One of the questions we get asked a lot is how often should I check my trail camera.

It's kind of relative to each situation being a little bit differentbut situation like this where we've got a row crop field you know it's not goingto hurt to go in there and check your camera every couple weeks but there issome places like if you're putting the camera up close to a bedding area orright next to a food source that's tucked back in the woods where they maybe using some of the surrounding cover around it pretty regularly you don'twant to be going in there every three days to check your camera that's onereally nice thing about these newer cameras that have cell capability andcan send you the pictures either through email or through text messaging is thatyou don't have to be there to check your camera and you're not walking into woodsor walking past their bedding area and spooking them by checking your cameraeven if it's every couple of weeks so kind of the location your camera has alot to do with how how often you should check it and you know your deer betterthan anybody so you can kind of gauge what that needs to be for your propertybut it's hard not to want to check them every day because you're alwayswondering what's on there but you're not going to help yourself out by checkingyour camera every couple of days and you're leaving a lot of scent behind andjust kind of educating the deer to your travel pattern and how you come in and out of the woods.

The cell capable cameras work really good especially if you live a long way fromyour farm and you can't get up there to check it on a regular basistheir worth the money to be able to have a camera that's always sending youpictures and you can kind of keep up with what's going on while you're not there.

Let's talk about what the best bait is for your trail camera.

There's a lotof good stuff out there on the market attractant wise that you can put outbut regardless what you decide to put out in front of your camera and what'sworked for you in the past location is really everything.

If I'm gonna put some bait out ideally you want to put it in a spot that the deeralready wanted to be there anyway whether it be a trail coming to and froma food plot or a good travel corridor from a food source to a bedding areathose are there is that you already know that you're gonna be using the areaanyway so if you put some bait out you're basically just encouraging themto stop so you can get their picture taken and I mean let's face it we'rewe're all one pictures of bucks not slick heads.

If you really want to get the bestpictures over your bait regardless of what you decide you want to use you wantto put it in a spot that the deer already want to be at you know somethingwe've had a lot of good luck with last couple years is this chestnut magic it'sa really simple blend of ground and whole chestnuts and rice bran and itworks great especially in a spot like we've got here where we've got a foodplot with peas and beans that the deer are using really hard and we're just ina roadway that connects to this food source so the deer are going to becoming from the bedding area and there's a creek right here they're going to becoming through here they walk right down this road every day and so what we'reusing it for is just something to encourage them to stop and get a goodstill picture taken of them right here and we already know that Bucks use thisbedding area over here during the warm season so this is just a perfect area toput our bait out what you use for bait is really relative to where you are inthe country and what's worked for you in the past but just remember that locationis really everything regardless of what you decide to use for bait.