Top 10 Best Voltage Converters - Jul 2019

609 Reviews Scanned

Are you looking for the best Voltage Converters? Let’s go ahead and have a look at our top 10 best Voltage Converters in Jul 2019.


We have scanned 609 reviews and come down with top 10 best Voltage Converters from Electronics & Computers products.


Here are our top 10 best Voltage Converters in 2019 reviews. Take a look at our recommended items and learn more about the features of each to help you select the item to buy.

Rank Product Name Score
1 First Place Odoga Voltage Converter 220V to 110V With 4 USB Ports [5V/2.1A Each] 3 Odoga Voltage Converter 220V to 110V With 4 USB Ports [5V/2.1A Each] 3
By Odoga
9.6
Score
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2 ECOACE 2000W Voltage Converter with 4 USB Ports,Set Down 220V to 110V Power ECOACE 2000W Voltage Converter with 4 USB Ports,Set Down 220V to 110V Power
By ECOACE
9.5
Score
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3 Voltage Converter 220V to 110V With 4 USB Ports [5V/2.1A Each] THZY International Voltage Converter 220V to 110V With 4 USB Ports [5V/2.1A Each] THZY International
By THZY
9.2
Score
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4 Best Value Voltage Converter Adapter Step Down 220V to 110V AC Output Rated Current 7A Voltage Converter Adapter Step Down 220V to 110V AC Output Rated Current 7A
By Powerjc
8.8
Score
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5 TryAce 2000W Voltage Converter with 2 USB Ports,Set Down 220V to 110V TryAce 2000W Voltage Converter with 2 USB Ports,Set Down 220V to 110V
By TryAce
8.6
Score
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6 Baban Voltage Converter Universal Travel Adapter, Step Down 220V to 110V Converter Baban Voltage Converter Universal Travel Adapter, Step Down 220V to 110V Converter
By Baban
8.3
Score
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7 HYTED World Travel Adapter and Converter Combo 2000 Watts Step Down Power Converter HYTED World Travel Adapter and Converter Combo 2000 Watts Step Down Power Converter
By HYTED
7.9
Score
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8 2000W Step Down Voltage Converter 220V to 110V and Universal Travel Plug Adapter 2000W Step Down Voltage Converter 220V to 110V and Universal Travel Plug Adapter
By ElecLead
7.7
Score
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9 Updated 2019 Version 2000W Travel Adapter,International Universal Travel Plug Adapters Voltage Converter Power Updated 2019 Version 2000W Travel Adapter,International Universal Travel Plug Adapters Voltage Converter Power
By TryAce
7.5
Score
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10 ALL IN ONE World Travel Plug Power Adapter 2000 Watts Voltage Converter Step ALL IN ONE World Travel Plug Power Adapter 2000 Watts Voltage Converter Step
By Bonazza
7.1
Score
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Voltage Adapter or Converter? | Understanding the Difference & Determining What You Need

Hi there, it's Ernest from Trip Astute.

In this video, we're covering a commonquestion asked by international travelers, which is, "what is thedifference between a voltage adaptor and converter?"(light chiming music)I remember the first time I went overseas I wrestled with this question.

To me, they seemed to be thesame thing, but when I looked online, the prices varied dramatically betweenadapters and converters.

So today, we're going to break it down.

Let's talk aboutadapters.

Adapters come in a variety of shapes and sizes from all-in-one unitsto kits for different plug sizes.

They're also fairly inexpensive.

Basically, all the adapter does is that it allows you to plug your currentdevice into another plug.

For example, in North America, we're used to the two orthree prong plug.

But here's the adapter for the UK.

It's quite different.

From atechnical standpoint, your device is receiving the actual voltage from theelectrical plug.

In general, that means a voltage anywhere from 100 to 240 voltsat 50 or 60 Hertz frequency.

For example, in North America, our typical electricplugs run at 120 volts at 60 Hz.

However, in the UK, the electrical plugsrun at 230 volts at 50 Hz.

A converter, on the other hand, converts the voltageand frequency from your destination's electrical plug to your normal powersupply's voltage and frequency.

They are more expensive than adapters andgenerally start around $30 to $40.

They also tend to be larger and moreclunky since the units are actually processing the electrical current.

Nowwhy does this even matter? Well, if your device is rated to run at at 120 voltsand you connect it to 230 volts, you could overload and fry your device.

Luckily most electronic device chargers are ready to handle a range of power, sothey should be able to adapt.

You can generally see the range listed on yourcharger, so it's worth checking them out when packing for your trip.

I personally haven't seen a phone,computer, or camera in the last 10 years that isn't able to accept variousvoltages from around the world.

However, certain household devices arenotorious for causing overloads and burnouts.

These include hair dryers andhair curlers.

These are typically electrical devices that function more assmall appliances.

These devices are more sensitive and have to be plugged intothe rated power supply.

I've heard horror stories of hair dryers and electricalplugs burning up because of this mismatch.

So, for most travelers, you canprobably get away without a converter when traveling.

However, if you're headingto a special event or want or need to have a hair dryer with you, here are youroptions.

Number one: buy a converter.

There are a tonout there and I've included links to a few on Amazon.

Most come with adapters aswell, so you won't need to purchase those in addition to the converter.

Number two:buy a travel version of the device that accepts multiple voltages.

For example, inthe case of hair dryers, most of the manufacturers offer a travel versionthat can accept two or more voltages.

Number three: call your lodging inadvance and arrange to borrow one.

This can be a bit of a pain, but you can oftenuse Skype or another online service to make a cheap international call.

Also, wedid a quick video on calling international numbers, so definitelycheck it out if you need help with dialing internationally.

Keep in mindthat it's not always customary for hostels and even some smaller hotels tohave hair dryers in the room.

So don't be surprised if they don't have oneavailable to use.

Number four: buy one at your destination.

This is definitely alast resort, but it's always an option if all else fails.

This way, you can alwaysget a device that is rated for the local voltage and frequency.

Have you ever hadany issues with charging or using your electronic devices while traveling? if so,please share your story in the comments section.

And if you have any questions,please let us know.

I've included some helpful articles below with the voltageand frequency for every country.

Also, I've added Amazon links to some adaptersand converters that you can purchase if needed.

As always, I do get a smallpercentage if you use my links.

It doesn't cost youanything extra, but it helps us to build more content for this channel.

Until nexttime, travel safe and travel smart.